Last year's wet summer is probably a long way from people's minds right now.

The emphasis, I am sure, is about maintaining and sustaining gardens: this will involve some watering, mulching and in some cases reduction, to keep plants fresh and alive.

If you are starting from scratch it's worth considering plants which can tolerate high temperatures and drought conditions.

It would be good to compile a list of plants which are known to do well when the weather is scorching hot.

Feel free to add your recommendation and do add a photo if you have one.

Tags: arrid, drought, dry, harsh, plants, tolerant, water

Views: 529

Reply to this topic

Replies to This Discussion

Sempervivum spp.

Artemesia Powys Castle

Festuca Clauca

Salvia spp. Sage

Euphorbia spp.

More Salvias, - this one is Clary Sage, and is also brilliant for cutting (here with Escholzia - Californian poppy)

Stachys byzantina

As a general rule, most plants with grey or silvery leaves, furry leaves or succulent stems will tolerate full sun and drought conditions.

And the other general rule is that, if you advise people to plant for dry conditions, you'll be quoting for land-drains the next year, lol!

Personally, I've done "mediterranean" designs when asked, but I think native plants are always most suited to our extremely changeable weather.

Nick @ NM Garden Services Ltd said:

As a general rule, most plants with grey or silvery leaves, furry leaves or succulent stems will tolerate full sun and drought conditions.

Quite!!
Paul McNulty said:

And the other general rule is that, if you advise people to plant for dry conditions, you'll be quoting for land-drains the next year, lol!

Personally, I've done "mediterranean" designs when asked, but I think native plants are always most suited to our extremely changeable weather.

Nick @ NM Garden Services Ltd said:

As a general rule, most plants with grey or silvery leaves, furry leaves or succulent stems will tolerate full sun and drought conditions.

Cistus corbariensis is a favourite of ours – about a meter across – and evergreen.

When we have hot and dry spots to fill (we do maintenance, not design) we go with Geranium Johnson's Blue ..we've lots of it on our allotment - with the original white Osteospermum eklonis planted behind to trail through.

At long term job places we always sow lots of hardy annuals, esp. the Californian poppies – Eschscholtzia, and we're trying the Dahlberg daisy this year for the first time.

Hardy annuals don't cost anything and are often so much more flamboyant than HHA. Buying trays of half hardies has always seemed to me like buying TV dinners from sainsburies. (but we do have to sometimes)

This is Len in his Lavender, surely one of the best 'hot and dry' shrubs

Sedum spp.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Landscape Juice sponsored by

LJN Sponsors

UK waste transfer stations

© 2014   Landscape Juice ® Limited - Registered in England 08356644

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service